Gervais

Dave Gervais – Education Committee Chairman

 

 

The Topic of our feature is income inequality. The disparity of wealth

between the classes is growing at an alarming rate and those that control the

wealth hope that you are not paying attention. But how can we not notice when a

bank gets a bailout but we lose our houses; or when a company like Hostess files

for bankruptcy and the CEO’s take home big bonuses but the employees take

home pink slips. How is it that our parents had a house, a car, a few kids, and a

savings all on one salary but many of us need two or three salaries just to live

paycheck-to-paycheck?

Thanks to the occupy movement, this issue is reaching the mainstream and

people are talking about it. From Warren Buffett, to economist Paul Krugman, to

former Secretary of Labor Robert Reich and current Labor Secretary Thomas

Perez, to senators Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders, to the President and

even the Pope. Income inequality is eroding the fabric of this nation and a lack of

upward mobility is tarnishing our image around the globe.

Pope Francis said “We have created new idols. The worship of the ancient

golden calf has returned in a new and ruthless guise in the idolatry of money and

the dictatorship of an impersonal economy lacking truly human purpose.” And

“The grave financial and economic crises of the present time…have pushed man

to seek satisfaction, happiness and security in consumption and earnings out of

all proportion to the principles of a sound economy. The succession of economic

crises should lead to a timely rethinking of our models of economic development

and to a change in lifestyle.”

President Obama said in his speech at THEARC

“The American people’s frustrations are rooted in their own daily

battles – to make ends meet, to pay for college, buy a home, save for

retirement. It’s rooted in the nagging sense that no matter how hard they

work, the deck is stacked against them. And it’s rooted in the fear that

their kids won’t be better off than they were. That fear is a dangerous

and growing inequality and lack of upward mobility that has jeopardized

middle-class America’s basic bargain – -that if you work hard, you have a

chance to get ahead.

The Topic of our feature is income inequality. The disparity of wealth

between the classes is growing at an alarming rate and those that control the

wealth hope that you are not paying attention. But how can we not notice when a

bank gets a bailout but we lose our houses; or when a company like Hostess files

for bankruptcy and the CEO’s take home big bonuses but the employees take

home pink slips. How is it that our parents had a house, a car, a few kids, and a

savings all on one salary but many of us need two or three salaries just to live

paycheck-to-paycheck?

Thanks to the occupy movement, this issue is reaching the mainstream and

people are talking about it. From Warren Buffett, to economist Paul Krugman, to

former Secretary of Labor Robert Reich and current Labor Secretary Thomas

Perez, to senators Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders, to the President and

even the Pope. Income inequality is eroding the fabric of this nation and a lack of

upward mobility is tarnishing our image around the globe.

Pope Francis said “We have created new idols. The worship of the ancient

golden calf has returned in a new and ruthless guise in the idolatry of money and

the dictatorship of an impersonal economy lacking truly human purpose.” And

“The grave financial and economic crises of the present time…have pushed man

to seek satisfaction, happiness and security in consumption and earnings out of

all proportion to the principles of a sound economy. The succession of economic

crises should lead to a timely rethinking of our models of economic development

and to a change in lifestyle.”

President Obama said in his speech at THEARC

“The American people’s frustrations are rooted in their own daily

battles – to make ends meet, to pay for college, buy a home, save for

retirement. It’s rooted in the nagging sense that no matter how hard they

work, the deck is stacked against them. And it’s rooted in the fear that

their kids won’t be better off than they were. That fear is a dangerous

and growing inequality and lack of upward mobility that has jeopardized

middle-class America’s basic bargain – -that if you work hard, you have a

chance to get ahead.

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